Saturday, Nov 22, 2014
Columns

Most financial problems are self-made


Published:

One of the first columns I ever wrote spoke to the subject of welfare. My position was that “there was already far too much welfare, most of which was undeserved and unnecessary.”

In supporting my minority opinion on financial aid to an exponentially growing mass of applicants, I took first one then another example, as cited by some liberal columnist, and proved, logically, that each incident of “vital welfare” was, in fact, caused only by the recipient’s irresponsible, reckless, lazy and/or ignorant behavior.

That trend continues, and even increases today. News reports seem filled with tear-jerking stories about the millions of us that exist only because of whatever welfare we are “entitled” to.

The latest of those attempts was one to excite public anger at a government that won’t provide welfare, to which a child is “entitled,” because its mother is away for a few months, as part of having chosen to “do her patriotic duty, by enlisting in the armed services.”

The father, who’s still here at home, is reported to be a bum, so grandparents are caring for the child, and they feel that the “good ole gubbiment” should be sending them checks, because they have to care for a child created in a thoughtless marriage and then abandoned by a mother who had many job opportunities at home, but instead volunteered for one that’s essentially meant for men and requires the enlistee to leave home at a moment’s notice. Self-made problem? Every bit of it!

Yes, if the general public lived informed, responsible lives, perhaps 95 percent of the current welfare payments would be unnecessary. I strongly support our caring for the remaining 5 percent, but resent being forced to contribute financially to the irresponsible lifestyles lived by millions alleged to now have no other choice than to depend on me to put pizza and beer on their table, cable TV in their home and lottery tickets in their pockets.

Marriages should be forever, divorces damned difficult to get and fathers forced to support their families, or be pilloried and whipped in public (no, slapping them in jail isn’t an option). Mothers should not be allowed to take jobs that require them to abandon children still of school age.

And instead of just throwing money (yours and mine) at the problem, governments should be working to encourage the masses to work hard, put aside something of each paycheck as savings for tomorrow, live within their means and expect to have to care for themselves and their families.

Much of this avoidable problem has been either caused or exacerbated by society’s destructive slide into liberalism and socialism.

Yes, Hillary, Nancy, et al, there does sometimes appear to be great and growing need for government to provide financial aid to billions of us, but such “need” is more a function of a dysfunctional society than anything else. And it seems that the future holds no suggestion that the gloomy picture will improve.

Hedonistic, lazy masses want more societal “rights” and “liberties,” while pandering politicians act primarily to accommodate such selfish, destructive demands.


Of Cabbages and Kings is a syndicated column by J.G. Nash. Relevant comment may be sent to him at jgn@jgnash.com.

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