Sunday, Sep 21, 2014
Letters

Letters to the editor

Published:

Kudos for the colonel

Re: Col Meyers’ column, “Going back to ‘where it all begins’”

While reading this column (Voices, Aug. 3), I understood and deeply felt every word that was written. I could sense and feel the pride rising in me. I also understand the pride you feel as having served our country. I’m sure you have more excellent and exciting articles to write especially about your assignment to the marine barracks. These types of columns are cheerful and assist in relieving the body and soul of the doom and gloom in the world today.

Julius Ricks Spring Hill

Support for school board candidates

Politics is surrounded by much negativity and skepticism. Politicians can be corrupt or dishonest, or they can be progressive, honest and in tune with the needs of society. We, the people of our republic, should consider the veracity of those who we put in positions of trust and honor.

I served on the Hernando County School Board from November 2008 until November 2012. My heart always has been open to the people and their needs but my mind has, oftentimes, been closed to what was happening around me. I have always wanted to see the better part of a people and believe that people who run for office believe they have more good attributes than bad. I believe that people don’t change when they are elected to an office.

I realized after my term had ended that my contributions to the Hernando County School Board were minimal. I absorbed what really had happened when a reporter asked me what I was most proud of during my tenure. As I thought back, I realized that no one listened to or voted for a thing I suggested in four years. I thought when I pursued elected office, I could offer a different perspective based on my life experiences and educational background.

When I ran for office, more than 37,000 voters supported me. The voters knew that I had a bachelor’s degree in business, had operated a successful business for 23 years in Hernando County, had worked in Hernando County public schools for three years and in higher educational at Pasco-Hernando Community College for 10 years, was appointed by the governor to serve on the district board of trustees at P-HCC, had served in the military and was honorably discharged, and was active in the community since moving to Hernando County in 1973.

I deeply care for people and realize we have surpassed the crossroads and need to make the best possible decisions in this 2014 election. From 2008-2012, I received a clandestine type of support from many but the only persons who openly supported me and my views were (current school board candidates) Robert Neuhausen, Don Whiting, Jay Rowden and Beth Naverud. Politically, I support those who support me. Thanks to my supporters.

James C. Yant Spring Hill

Editor’s note: The writer was a member of the Hernando County School Board for four years.

America headed in wrong direction

Kudos to Russ Columbo for his excellent letter on the inevitable downfall of our form of government. He correctly defines the forces that are being brought to bear to emasculate the exceptional form of government that was initiated in our founding documents. The so-called “transformation of America” that was so important in order for the first family to shed their hatred of America was nothing less than a strategy initially proposed by Saul Alinsky in “Rules for Radicals” and Cloward and Piven in their Cloward Piven Strategy.

Alinsky lays out eight rules for transformation of society to a more fair society . None of his rules address the importance of empowering the people. Rather the first rule notes the importance of establishing government controlled health care in order to control the people. The other seven are just as draconian.

The Soviet Union took 80 years to fester and die even though it built walls and killing fields to contain its populace. These were people who were supposed to be in a system of pure equality.

I think that the evolving system of public manipulation, omnipresent public surveillance and the threat of prosecution for individualism and independent thought is well established in America. It will take decades to re-establish the political system that made America exceptional. Perhaps if our educational system required reading books like 1984 we’d be better off. Orwell was 30 years ahead of time.

Terry Lyon Brooksville

Save the planet, go vegan

Last weekend the drinking water of 400,000 Toledo residents was fouled by animal waste. With unfettered growth of animal agriculture and ineffective discharge regulations, it will happen again in our own state.

The problem has become pervasive. Waste from chicken farms has rendered ocean off the East Coast unfit for fishing. Waste from Midwest cattle ranches carried by Mississippi River has created a permanent “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico larger than that of the infamous 2010 BP oil spill.

Animal agriculture dumps more pollution to our waterways than all other human activities combined. Principal pollutants are animal manure, fertilizers, as well as soil particles, organic debris, and pesticides from feed cropland. Manure and fertilizers promote growth of toxic algae that poison drinking water supplies. Organic matter feeds microorganisms that deplete oxygen and kill fish.

Effective regulations to limit dumping of animal waste into water supplies have been blocked by the meat industry.

Fortunately, every one of us has the power to stop this outrage three times a day by saying ‘no’ to polluting meat and dairy products. Our local supermarket offers ample alternatives. Entering “live vegan” in a search engine provides useful recipes and transition tips.

Herculates Turnbell Weeki Wachee

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