Saturday, Oct 25, 2014
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Student named state science leader

Published:
TALLAHASSEE -

A Hernando High School senior was selected last week by Gov. Rick Scott as one of two most promising young scientific leaders in Florida’s 2013 high school graduating class.

Delaney Rose Ahrens, of Brooksville, was invited by West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to serve as a Florida ambassador at the 50th annual National Youth Science Camp in Green Bank, West Virginia.

Laurie Jean Scott, a senior in the International Baccalaureate program at South Fork High School in Stuart, was the second ambassador recognized by the two governors, and Lachonda Marie Lacey from Sumter County, and Tessa Marie Voorhees from Seminole County have been selected as alternates.

“Thanks to our great teachers, Florida students are among the best in the world,” Scott said. “I had the opportunity to attend Florida’s State Science Fair in Lakeland, and saw first-hand how advanced Florida’s students are in STEM education. Laurie and Delaney were selected as the most promising scientific leaders in Florida, and they’ll serve as great ambassadors for the Sunshine State in West Virginia.”

Ahrens will attend Purdue University next fall and will study pharmaceutical sciences. Delaney also presented her research at the State Science and Engineering Fair and has been active in the local, state and national 4-H and Future Farmers of America.

She is also involved with the National Honor Society, Phi Theta Kappa, soccer and community service projects.

“Student achievement in STEM subjects is vital to success in up-and-coming high-skill, high-wage careers,” Commissioner of Education Tony Bennett said. “I applaud these talented young ladies on their nominations and am confident they will represent the Sunshine State well at the National Youth Science Camp.”

Established in 1963 as a part of West Virginia’s Centennial Celebration, the National Youth Science Camp is an annual summer forum where two delegates representing each state exchange ideas with leading scientists and other professionals from the academic and corporate worlds.

Scientists from across the United States who work on some of the most provocative topics in science today — fractal geometry, the human genome project, global climate change, the history of the universe, the fate of rain forests and robotics — present lectures and hands-on research projects.

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