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Oak Hill announces 2011 Frist humanitarian award winners

Staff
Published:   |   Updated: May 7, 2013 at 02:58 PM

Three Frist Humanitarian awards are given annually to each HCA hospital to honor outstanding individuals for humanitarian and volunteer activities whose daily dedication and care-giving epitomize the highest standards of quality and personal commitment.

The award is named in honor of the late Dr. Thomas F. Frist, Sr., founder of HCA and renowned humanitarian.

One award recognizes an HCA associate who goes beyond day-to-day responsibilities and their overall service to the community. The second award recognizes an HCA volunteer who gives unselfishly in their service to the facility. The third award is announced for a physician who best epitomizes Dr. Thomas Frist, Sr.'s commitment to the communities in which we serve.

This is the first step in naming the recipient of the nationwide Frist Humanitarian Award, the highest honor given to an associate, volunteer, and physician at HCA. National recipients will be honored on May 16 at a reception at the company's national Nashville, Tennessee headquarters.

Additionally, the associate and volunteer finalists each receive a bronze statute, a $5000 gift to the charity of their choice and a $5,000 cash gift. The physician recipient will receive a $10,000 gift to the charity of his or her choice and a bronze statue. In addition to the three national recipients, the judges will select two associate finalists, two physician finalists and two volunteer finalists. The associate and volunteer finalists receive a $1,000 cash award and a $1,000 gift to the charity of their choice. The physician finalists will receive $2,000 to the charity of his or her choice.

The volunteer and associate Frist Award winners at Oak Hill Hospital will receive a cash award of $250 and a 10k gold Frist lapel pin. The physician recognized as a Frist Award winner receives a Frist lapel pin and a voucher for a $250 donation to the charity of his or her choice.

Adriane Imwalle came to Oak Hill Hospital in January 2008 directly from school and is currently a radiology technologist. In October 2011 Adriane spent a weekend with the Women of Faith conference in Tampa, Florida assisting World Vision, which is a Christian relief, development and advocacy organization dedicated to working with children, families and communities to overcome poverty and injustice. Earlier this year, Adriane decided to take her care and concern for others a much larger step further. Along with other members of Northcliffe Baptist Church, Adriane traveled to Panimaquin, Guatemala on a mission trip. One of her main duties during the trip was to participate in vacation Bible school for the children of the village. Approximately 100 children attended and participated in craft projects, Bible lessons, puppet shows and other activities. The children also received a hot meal during that time. After the lessons were completed, Adriane and her group walked through the streets of the village passing out candy and informing the villagers of the free medical clinic that the group had set up. Over 700 patients were able to receive treatment in the five days that the group was in Guatemala. In addition, Adriane and her group were able to pass out four suitcases full of clothes and shoes. Adriane has two daughters, 18 and 20, and enjoys being outdoors.

Although the volunteer award is normally given to one individual, Marge and Peter Fontan are regarded by all as a team. They have been married for 53 years and have volunteered together in the emergency department at Oak Hill Hospital since 2009. Marge and Peter work with many different groups and organizations in the area including the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), the Hernando County Fire Corps and the Emergency Response Team (CERT) just to name a few. Through RSVP Marge and Peter offer their assistance to the Hernando County Fair, the Reggae Fest, local hospice sites and local schools to judge school projects throughout the program. They also participate in the Hernando County Fire Corps which consists of 29 community volunteers supporting local firefighters, police officers and emergency personnel. Marge and Peter facilitate smoke houses – the small portable buildings that simulate a smoke-filled house. They teach children how to react to this type of emergency and crawl to safety. Marge and Peter also participate in traffic control through the fire corpse. They respond to accident calls and help direct traffic around accident scenes. The Citizens Emergency Response Team (CERT) is an extension of the Hernando County sheriff's Office. Both Marge and Peter receive special training which enhances their ability to prepare for, respond to and recover from all types of disasters. When not volunteering in the hospital's emergency department, Marge and Peter also work in our on-site H2U/Partner's Club where they serve meals to elderly individuals from our community who may not be getting sufficient meals or nutrition. Once the meals are served, Marge washes pans while Peter collects and dumps the garbage. They also support many of the activities that are coordinated through Hernando County Parks & Recreation Department. Marge and Peter truly exhibit what Dr. Frist was describing when he said, "Be happy. Be active. There is so much good to do in this world and so many different ways to do it."


Dr. Amy Capoocia has a reputation as a caring and passionate physician who continuously demonstrates a genuine concern for others through her efforts in her practice and the community. She has been with Oak Hill Hospital only since 2010 but was here previously from 2006 through 2008. She is board certified in family medicine and provides the services of osteopathic manipulative medicine, minor skin procedures, joint injections and women's health education at her practice in Brooksville. She received her degree in osteopathic medicine from the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine in Biddeford, Maine. She then completed her internship and family practice residency at St. Joseph Medical Center in Philadelphia where she served as Chief Medical Resident in her final year of training. Caring for others runs in Dr. Capoocia's family. She remembers as a child her parents opening their home to pregnant runaway teens that set the example that led her to giving back to her community as an adult. From 1998-1999 she volunteered at Covenant House in Ft. Lauderdale where she helped runaway, homeless and at risk youth. From 2008-2009 Dr. Capoocia served on the board of the Children's Home for Reading in Reading, Pennsylvania. The Children's Home of Reading provides a treatment oriented residential environment for children and teenagers as well as community-based services. Since settling down in Brooksville with her husband and five children Dr. Capoocia has made it a point to have a positive impact on her local community. For instance, from 2007 to 2008 she served on the Hernando County Health Department's SAVE (Sexual Assault Victim Exam) team. In addition, she has served on the board of the Dawn Center where she helps organize fundraisers, which is essential since the Dawn Center functions completely on donations. Dr. Capoocia also "gets her hands dirty" at the Dawn Center; she helps clean and organize and helps with the upkeep of the building "patching holes, etc." Dr. Capoocia also volunteers at Crescent Clinic, the no cost health clinic in Hernando County. She is able to care for patients who may otherwise not be able to receive medical treatment. Since 2011 she has volunteered once a month in the clinic and even completes some procedures in her own office if they are not available at the Crescent Clinic. Dr. Capoocia also offers two-month internships to medical residents at Nova Southeastern University. This provides opportunities for students to gain experience in family practice at her office in Brooksville. Dr. Capoocia has made it a point to pass the lessons taught to her by her parents onto her own children. Dr. Capoocia and her children volunteer at local soup kitchens throughout the year. Her children even at a young age have already been presented with situations where they realize that someone needed help. They responded just as expected by offering their own food to a person in need. Dr. Capoocia truly represents the very core of what the Frist Humanitarian Award is about. When asked about her philosophy in helping others Dr. Capoocia says, "It is good to be a good person; we have been very blessed and want to give back. There is always someone less fortunate than you. Take care of others when you can and they will take care of you." She has truly touched many lives through her compassionate and caring nature.
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