Thursday, Oct 23, 2014
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Security leaks and other issues


Published:   |   Updated: May 7, 2013 at 06:44 PM

While all the attention is focused on Benghazi, another issue is who was responsible for serious intelligence leaks. While the administration was spiking the Osama bin Laden issue, somehow there was a stream of leaks about the killing of the al-Qaida leader.

It was a little-known fact that a female operative had been tracking bin Laden since the Bush administration and was largely responsible for locating him. According to some sources, his location was known for at least nine months, but on the advice of Valerie Jarrett, the president deferred taking action.  

It was Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta who got the president to take action, even as the SEALs were on their way to Pakistan. Then there was a most egregious lapse in security when the name of the Pakistani doctor who had aided in the locating of bin Laden was leaked and the Pakistani government arrested him, tried him and sentenced him to 33 years in prison.

Wouldn't it have made sense to get him and his family out of the country and relocated them perhaps to the United States? What a reward for his aiding the U.S. to be in effect "ratted out" and left to rot in prison.

One can only wonder what his feelings are toward the U.S. and the larger issue of how other people willing to help us in delicate situations will now react. That also begs the question of our relationship with Pakistan and why they would act so belligerent and not be glad that we eliminated a terrorist monster.

In addition, the naming of SEAL Team 6 was resented by the brave men who actually took out Bin Laden and should not have been done. Many believe these leaks emanated from the White House.

Apparently, our relationship is not that good with Pakistan even though we give the Pakistanis billions of dollars of U.S. taxpayer money in both nonmilitary and military aid to the tune of $4.3 billion a year, which is authorized through fiscal year 2014.

We have not learned the lesson that you cannot buy loyalty or friendship with money. That is true with the rest of the Middle Eastern countries and at some point we will have to rethink the whole question of aid to our not-so-friendly friends.

That is a major reason we should become energy independent of that area of the world. We have the resources, such as oil, coal, natural gas and nuclear power, to truly become energy independent. That alone would reduce our trade imbalance by billions of dollars and make it possible for us in the future to be a net exporter of energy.

Why should we guarantee loans worth billions to Brazil to drill offshore and become a customer, as the president stated, instead of supplying Brazil with oil? That would drastically improve our economy and provide millions of high-paying jobs for American citizens.


Len Tria, a regular columnist for Hernando Today, lives in Spring Hill and is a former Hernando County commissioner.

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